HOUSING:

What is the rent?

The rent is $350 per month. First and a $200 security deposit is required. If there is a concern or hardship please speak to the Independent Living Coordinator.

What does the rent include?

The rent includes housing, electric, water, cable, community phone and assistance and training in the LifeSkills needed to become independent and successful.

What happens if I can’t pay my rent on time?

For the rest of your life paying for your housing is a priority to help you avoid homelessness. If you are unable to pay your rent on time, we ask that you let your Resident Advisor (RA) know that you can’t pay: the reason why and your plans to resolve the problem. The RA will speak to the Director and a decision will be made. The first time you are late for a payment part of the corrective action to help you resolve the issue will be for you to make arrangements for ISI to reassign your future rent payment directly to Grace Landing. This arrangement will help you learn how to manage less money at one time.

What happens if I lose my key?

If you lose your key you will be responsible for the cost of changing the locks. This includes a replacement keys. At this time the estimated cost is $15.

That sounds like everything? Is there anything extra the resident must pay?

Yes!!! Rent does not include food. Generally, one meal a week is provided at Bible Study.

How long can I live here?

Any one resident can stay for 2 years as long as you abide by the rules and are working towards positive future goals.


MEALS:

Why aren’t meals included in the rent?

Because we would like to save you money. If meals were included we would have to increase the rent to pay for it. When it comes to food, it’s difficult to pick things that everyone will like. This way we are not wasting food and you are not paying for food you don’t like.

What happens if there is more “month than money”, how do I eat?

This happens to everyone at least once in their life. This is the time to learn how to plan and budget your money to avoid this happening when your family is depending on you. Remember … you are responsible for feeding yourself. Even your friends won’t want to share their food with you if you don’t have any money because you spent on other things. The first month that this happens we will assist in providing necessary food. If this becomes a pattern, the resident will be expected to participate in a budgeting plan and volunteer hours.


CURFEW:

OK! I’m being very responsible – paying my way, getting to school and work on my own … is there a curfew?

No, there is no official evening curfew. However, if you are going to be out after 1AM we ask that you notify the RA before 11PM. The reason: as residents, you are expected to learn life and time Management skills, which includes getting enough sleep to get up on time and be productive for whatever your day brings … generally school and/or work.

Ok, GREAT, so I can stay out all night if I want to, when I want to!?

No …. not really. We’re trying to teach you life-skills to help you be successful in life. When you live with others, in a community, in a family, there are rules of common courtesy that apply because people care about you and want to know that you’re safe and are able to be productive the next day. These are really easy rules … like I said before, if you’re going to be out after 1AM you must contact your Resident Advisor (RA) before 11:00 pm.

What will happen if I don’t contact the RA before 11:00 pm?

Residents who have not contacted, or left a message for the RA before 11:00 pm will receive a

disciplinary action.

What if I am out late without notifying the RA more than once?

If you choose to be out late without notifying the RA more than once, then you are choosing to have an official curfew enforced. You are also taking a chance of receiving a major disciplinary action, which can jeopardize your continued residency.


VISITORS:

Can I have guests over?

Yes, you are allowed 2 guests, at a time, between the hours of 9am and 11pm.

If the guest is the same gender as you, they are welcome in the common area or the resident’s bedroom – as long as the door is kept open. If the guest is not the same gender they must stay in the common areas.

What are common areas?

Living room, Dining room, and Kitchen.

I’m paying rent, are friends allowed to sleep over?

No, sleepovers are not allowed at the house.


TRANSPORTATION:

What if the prospective resident’s High School is not within Grace Landings boundaries, how would they get to school?

If the student is in a school within Osceola County, your agency is required to contact the Foster Care School Liaison to set up transportation to the school of their choice. It generally takes 2-3 weeks for transportation to be set up. In the meantime, if your agency is not able to provide bus vouchers for that time period the resident will have to take public transportation, walk, or bike to school until school bus transportation is available. A bus stop is right out the front door of the house.

How do I get to Grace Landing to pick up my check?

When you were a child people drove you to many of the places you needed to go to, now as an adult YOU make the plans. Here are your choices walk, take the bus, bike, drive, or ask someone if they are able to drive you where you need to go.

Don’t you provide transportation?

No, transportation is the resident’s responsibility. There are isolated occasions when we may provide transportation.


INCENTIVES:

If you choose to participate, we have different incentive levels for participating and meeting goals.


FAITH BASED:

Grace Landing is faith-based; does that mean I am forced to go to church?

No, we do NOT force you to go to church, synagogues, mosques, etc., however, you will be exposed to Christian beliefs through our weekly Bible study nights. ‘Research shows that a core religious belief can contribute to good health and success. Here are just a few examples:

Health:

The National Institute for Healthcare Research reviewed 158 professional studies. Three fourths showed that a religious commitment translated into benefits in psychological well-being, overall survival rates, or quality of life for everyone from cancer patients to drug abusers. (1)

Family:

Preliminary results of a psychological study indicate that healthy family functioning can be attributed to 14 specific behaviors, according to an Aug 18, 2004, news release from the Psychological Studies Institute. Using statistical analysis … found that 83% of a family’s health appears attributable to 14 sets of behaviors – One of which is: religious/faith core (2)

Marital Stability:

University of Virginia sociologist Brad Wilcox has studied how religious activity impacts divorce and marital stability. He finds that evangelicals who attend church regularly divorce at a rate 35 percent lower than secular couples … Similar trends are found for active Catholics and active mainline Protestants. In contrast, nominal evangelicals, who rarely or never attend church, have higher divorce rates than secular couples.” (3)

Mental Health:

Religious faith has big impact on reducing depression among African Americans, University of Chicago research shows.”


ADDRESS:

I was accepted into Grace Landing and need to put in a change of address at the Post Office. What will my address be?

After you’re accepted please contact us for your new address.


Endnotes:

1 Gilbert. Evelyn. Article: “The Spiritual Path to Better Health – Find Out How Faith Can Add Years to Your

Life,” National Health and We//ness”.

http://www.healthandwelinessclub.com/document.asp?dID=5957 > (26 July 2006)

2 Article: “Specific Behaviors May Influence Family Health,” AORN Journal, Nov, 2004.

http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi mOFSLlis 5 80/ai n6365091/print > (26 July 2006)

3W. Bradford Wilcox, “The Cultural Contradictions of Mainline Family Ideology and Practice,” publication

pending.

http://www.family.org/cforum/fosi/marriage/divorce/a0037068.cfm> (25 July 2006)

4 Press Contact: William Harris. “Religious Faith Has Big Impact on Reducing Depression Among African

Americans,” The University of Chicago News

Office, 13 April 2005, http://www-news.uchicago.edu/releases/05/050413.data.shtmI> (25 July 2006)